Optimism reigns at ice park amid grim climate forecast

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Push for new Ice Park water source offers hope despite prediction of warming temps

  • A climber makes her way up a steep wall of ice in the Ouray Ice Park during the 2018-19 climbing season. Despite predictions of warming temperatures in the region over the next 30 years, Ice Park supporters are excited about the attraction’s future, namely because of the launch of a $3 million campaign to build a new pipeline that would help ensure the availability of water necessary to operate the Ice Park. Photo courtesy Breanna Demont
    A climber makes her way up a steep wall of ice in the Ouray Ice Park during the 2018-19 climbing season. Despite predictions of warming temperatures in the region over the next 30 years, Ice Park supporters are excited about the attraction’s future, namely because of the launch of a $3 million campaign to build a new pipeline that would help ensure the availability of water necessary to operate the Ice Park. Photo courtesy Breanna Demont
By Carolina Brown & Mike Wiggins For the Ouray Ice Park, whose existence depends upon sufficient water and temperatures consistently cold enough to cultivate and sustain the blue-hued walls of frozen water that draw thousands of climbers every year, the climate forecast is grim. A 2013 report produced by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change contains dozens of projections that agree…

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