Group rallies to 'support the constitutional process'

  • A group of about 20 people who gathered in Hartwell Park Wednesday afternoon with flags said they wanted to show support for "the constitutional process."
    A group of about 20 people who gathered in Hartwell Park Wednesday afternoon with flags said they wanted to show support for "the constitutional process."
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A group of about 20 people who gathered in Hartwell Park Wednesday afternoon said they wanted to encourage people to "support the constitutional process." 

For about an hour, the group waved "don't tread on me," "come and take it," "live free or die," and American flags along Sherman Street. They talked among themselves and occasionally waved to people who honked as they passed. A large hand-painted sign on a truck read "support the Constitution's process USA." 

"This was about supporting the Constitution, nothing more, nothing less," Log Hill resident Scott Carlisle said. He and his wife, Anita Carlisle, who organized the event, both declined to offer more details about their platform, repeating only that it was about "supporting America and the constitutional process." 

Scott Carlisle said the event was not intended to be political, and that people were asked explicitly not to bring signs or flags for President Trump or any other candidate, though one person did bring a Trump flag and several participants' trucks had Trump bumper stickers.

Montrose resident Nancy Wake said she was participating "for freedom and constitutional rights." 

They shared mixed opinions on the violent riot in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday, where pro-Trump supporters stormed the United States Capitol building while Electoral College votes were being formally counted in Congress, forcing legislators to evacuate. Protests also broke out at statehouses around the country, including in Denver, where several hundred people gathered. 

"The people going into the Capitol ought to be in jail for the next 10 years," Scott Carlisle said, calling it "blatant disrespect."

Wake said she supported them, and said their actions showed that "the silent majority is no longer silent, and they're tired of being stomped on." She said fraudulent mail-in ballots were counted and dead people voted in the presidential election, both claims that have not been proven. "My concern is the left is getting away with murder and cheating, and we don't like being stolen from," she said.  

Ridgway Marshal Shane Schmalz and two other officers spoke briefly with the Carlisles and others gathered there, and watched from a distance until the group dispersed around 4:30 p.m.