Opinions

Fri
09
Feb
atodd's picture

Headlines: Shakespeare’s ghost stalks Colorado town

It’s the last day of 2017. New Year’s Eve. Another year is slipping away. Most of my life I’ve regretted the passing of another year. Not so much this year.

I awoke this morning with no thoughts of C.S. Lewis’s White Witch of Narnia. No thoughts of hopelessness and despair.

Blue skies. Cold sun. Frost on the windows. Snow on the ground. A good day to hunker down by the fireplace, read a good book and recover from too much of a good thing. 

Becky and I have been on the post-Christmas party circuit. Three parties in as many nights. We’re not party animals. Not by a long stretch. And this morning, I’m really not in a party mood.

Fri
09
Feb
atodd's picture

My struggle with holiday addictions…food for thought

I don’t know about you, but I’m relieved “The Holidays” are behind us. It’s depressing, how every freaking New Year I must embark on the wretched process of detox from a six-week steady diet of sugar, lard and beer. Resolutions and promises to maintain a healthy diet over “The Holidays” shatter like a dropped chocolate chip cookie, usually right after dinner on Thanksgiving Day (another piece of pecan pie, Mark?)
Birthdays and other one-day holiday food fests are easier handled. I can have a couple brats, eat some cake and ice cream, then get back on “the wagon of restraint.” But the mass junk-food gluttony of “The Holidays” now stretches from Thanksgiving to New Year’s Day…maybe even to Super Bowl Sunday, thanks to college bowl games and NFL playoffs. Ah, the temptation of wings, pizza and beer is too much.

Fri
09
Feb
atodd's picture

Predictions for Ouray County for 2018

Every year publications pull together a "year in review." We published one the first year we were here, perhaps the second, but haven't done one since. Reasons: everyone does it; it’s “easy” filler; and, we wonder how interesting it is to readers.
This year, we thought it would be more interesting to prognosticate on the year to come for Ouray County. Below, in our order of importance, are our predictions as to what will be the top issues and solutions to come for 2018. Have a different opinion? Send us your prognostications in a letter to the editor (under 500 words) to atodd@ouraynews.com.

Fri
09
Feb
atodd's picture

Becoming a translator of Cowboy talk

I was very young when I married my high school sweetheart. I was living in a smaller Southern California city, my father was on the city council and a Los Angeles County Sheriff, and my boyfriend was from the "wrong" side of town. So, as most young women do, I knew he was the One. The issues between us were huge: respect for the law was a big one and the fact that his family refused to speak English was the other. I found my younger self face to face with a genuine language barrier. I worked hard...I studied Spanish...I practiced speaking Spanish in the mirror...and I learned Spanish so well that I spoke with his family better than he did.

Fri
09
Feb
atodd's picture

Likes new school board

Dear Editor,
I read with great pleasure in the Plaindealer about the appointment of Heather Yeowell and Cindy Lystad to the Ridgway School Board. With their experience serving on other Boards and their commitment to the Ridgway community, they will help keep the Ridgway District as one of the top performing districts in Colorado. The Board's first action electing Greg Lawler as Board President is a wise move that will pay immediate dividends through his proven leadership and professionalism. These three members along with incumbents Colin Lacy and Tim Taplin will be an effective, dedicated Board. Lastly, Supt. Steve Smith, with his strong administrative team, will continue to provide insightful vision and collaborative decision-making that will maintain the excellence Ridgway staff, parents and students have come to
expect. The RSD is in "good hands.”

Steve Larivee
Reno, Nevada

Fri
09
Feb
atodd's picture

A time for stuffing stockings…and taking stock

As the end of 2017 fast approaches, it’s a natural time to look back, but it’s also a time to look ahead. Optimists are inclined always to look ahead. Pessimists are just the opposite. History is replete with wars and natural disasters and wrong turns.
Optimists tend to dislike and dismiss pessimists as dour and depressing. Expect the worst and it will happen. See the best in people and good things will happen.
Pessimists believe optimists are naïve and “in denial” about everything from human nature and social justice to the prospects for peace on earth and the seesawing price of gas at the pump.
Where you sit on the pessimism-optimism scale at any given time likely reflects where you stand on the political spectrum. Thus, the overwhelming majority of President Trump’s supporters are giddy optimists. And why not? The stock market is hitting historic highs!

Fri
09
Feb
atodd's picture

The final turnstile: Tribute to a fallen matriarch

"Sooner or later you come back for that which (is) stored away, and sometimes it isn't there."  

~ Off Ramp, Hank Stuever...Adventures and heartache in the American elsewhere.

Fri
09
Feb
atodd's picture

ROCC members voluteer in other areas

Dear Editor,

Fri
09
Feb
atodd's picture

Back country rangers needed

Dear Editor:
I am writing to address a concern that I have for our backcountry resource.
With the increased 4-wheel drive and ATV visitors to the San Juan Mountains, it would appear that additional back country rangers would be a necessity.
I have spoken with many of my friends and acquaintances who use the back country. They have all stated that during the summer, the mountain roads are busier than rush hour traffic in the cities they are from. Yet, we have ONE back ranger to patrol these mountain passes. In my excursions into our majestic mountains, I have seen signs that clearly state “No Motorized Vehicles” with tire tracks scarring the meadows beyond.
We need more back county rangers.
To protect this precious asset for ourselves and future visitors.
People become more mindful of their speed, safety and where they are driving, when they know there is someone there to enforce the regulations.

Fri
09
Feb
atodd's picture

What a city, Ouray!

What a city!
Last week I had a late night and lost a piece of clothing in the process.
Oh, you're thinking sure, Alan, you're going to tell us you were at the Coachlight Tavern and things got out of hand, right?
Not exactly.
I went to the Ice Park Committee meeting.
And it was quite the blur, so much so that the next day I looked all around for the new black fleece pullover my mother-in-law bought me and couldn't find it anywhere.
I searched the house, the office and even 6th Avenue where I had parked. I texted someone at the city and stopped by the police department to check on lost and found.
Nothing.
The next morning I was dropping Beecher off at City Hall and looked across the street. There on a railing was a black piece of clothing. I walked across and, lo and behold, there was my fleece.

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