Opinions

Thu
18
Oct

Wishing on the City fountains

I'm sure, what with water restrictions in both municipalities, that no one would water their lawn, or the sidewalk, or the street on a Monday or off days. Right?

The funny thing about watering those sidewalks and streets is they just don't get any greener.

I saw someone in Ouray watering the Uncompahgre River last week from the east side of the city. It's an interesting technique. First, water the sidewalk and street until they are saturated. This should take about three seconds. Then, watch as the water runs downhill all the way to the river. There you have it — you're a self-made water replenishment system. Maybe the city should adopt this system. It could water the pool parking lot with pool discharge water and watch it run off into the river, skipping this whole tedious business of getting approval from CDPHE.

Sat
22
Sep

Day would be proud

Dear Editor,
It is that time of the year for renewing my subscription to the Ouray County Plaindealer. And in the memory of David F. Day, who began a publication in Ouray called the Solid Muldoon almost 140 years ago, I take my hats off (I have more than one) to Mr. Todd and Beecher Threatt for continuing the legacy. You need not apologize in taking second for "best in class." It certainly was no "egg (whole-yoke) in the face."
What is most disturbing is the "big boys" of the printed page amalgamating every small-town weekly into nondescript oblivion. The danger is in losing that camaraderie and community spirit that can only be found in a publication like the Plaindealer. Where else can you find a "yellow brick road" where everyone is rushing to make a "deposit” (not a banking term in this context)? Hey. These are bonafide issues.

Sat
22
Sep

Only 18 months

Dear Editor,
Did you know that a 33-year-old man who seduces your 15-year-old daughter has committed only a misdemeanor? And that his only punishment may be 18 months of probation and sex offender classes—after which he is removed from the sex offender registry?
Apparently the District Attorney prosecuting Travis Buck for statutory rape considered it so unlikely that he’d get a conviction in this county that he was better off giving Mr. Buck this plea deal—a mere slap on the wrist for sexually assaulting a child. Did the DA think a conviction so unlikely because a Ouray County jury would sympathize with this statutory rapist? Really? Or was the investigation into the crime so belated and sloppy that the DA lacked the necessary evidence to convict?

Sat
22
Sep

“Reds Under the Beds” and schoolteachers in the streets

The headline in The New York Times (April 26, 2018) read, “Teachers in Arizona and Colorado Walk Out Over Education Funding.” The story opened with news of a walkout that caused hundred of public schools in Arizona to shut down and “turned the streets of Downtown Phoenix into seas of crimson….”
Teachers, students and sympathizers wearing red T-shirts and chanting “Red for ED” marched to the State Capitol.
Red for Ed! For those of us old enough to remember Joseph McCarthy and catchy Cold War slogans like “Better dead than red,” such a chant issuing from street demonstrations in Denver and Phoenix seems farfetched.
FAKE NEWS!
I lived in Phoenix. My first job was in Phoenix. Teaching.
Oh sure, antiwar and civil rights demonstrations happened on college campuses back in the day, but they DO NOT happen in Arizona in this day and age. Or Colorado.
Do they?

Sat
22
Sep

Access is what it's all about

We don't kid ourselves around the ol' newspaper about the tenuous nature of legal notices being required to be published with us.
Government entities are required to publish notices in the dominant medium serving that area. In return, newspapers offer a vehicle of transparency for the public, a verification that governments are doing what they are supposed to do. Likewise, many court-related orders require legal notice postings in the newspaper. You'll find an example of that in the "Summons by Publication" on page 14 in this issue.

Sat
22
Sep

Turning 141 this week

Like an odometer tracking the historic mileage of Ouray County, we just rolled over to our 141st year this week. The Silverton Standard and the Miner is two years older, being the oldest operating business on the Western Slope.
The paper has been through a lot, including several name changes and an ownership duo who, according to former owner/publisher Joyce Jorgensen, drank and argued frequently until one torched the newspaper office out of vengeance on the other.
One of the original owners, Henry Ripley, established the Ouray Times with his brother, William, printing the first edition June 16, 1877, just one year after the city of Ouray was incorporated. A train of six wagons brought the type and press from Cañon City, which also happened to be the first press in Colorado Territory, having been used to print the Cherry Creek Pioneer in Denver City, among other first papers in Colorado communities.

Sat
22
Sep

There they go again!

Well, they did it again. That lisp of a leaflet just 11 miles west of us as the crow flies, but worlds away using any measurement of ethics, lifted our work again.
It took a paragraph from the story we ran last week about the Ridgway School Board hiring a new superintendent. That would be our story, our work.
You'll recall just a few months ago they used the collective work of our reporting on local court cases involving sexual abuse as the basis for one of their probing, in-depth rehashed looks into Ouray County.
Never mind that not a soul from that pilfering periodical set foot in court for any of the local, high-profile cases. Somehow the background and history of those cases just flowed from their pages like a prison break when the warden wasn't looking.
They don't need to be here to impress our work upon its readers.

Sat
22
Sep

Developing a flashy personality

This month finds our family celebrating a wonderful birthday. It’s not the kids..not the grandkids..not the Cowboy…it’s Wiley’s first birthday.
Wiley is my colt. Steve bought him for me last July as a weanling (horse under the age of 1). We have had him at home since November. He is a joy to behold. I have never raised a horse from weanling. It is an experience I have always wanted to be a part of but never had the chance. I am loving every minute of it. He changes daily and his muscle structure is a wonder to look at. As Steve puts it, “he’s a well built son of a **tch.”

Sat
22
Sep

Thanks for the boost

Dear Editor,

Sat
22
Sep

Community that cares

Dear Editor,
Ouray County Communities that Care (CTC) would like to recognize and thank the all the members of our coalition. We thank you for the many hours that you have volunteered and we are so proud of the commitment and work that everyone has shown!
We are thrilled to be moving into phase four of five of the CTC process. This July marks the beginning of the third year for our CTC grant. Over the course of the last two years, the coalition has identified and engaged a diverse range of community members and key leaders. We have learned about prevention science and how we can use it to better our community.
The coalition formed several different workgroups: youth involvement, risk and protective factor assessment, resource assessment and evaluation, community board maintenance, community outreach, and funding.

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