Opinions

Thu
18
Oct

What's it going to be, El or La?

So, what's it going to be? An unseasonably warm winter or teeth-chattering cold with lots of snow?
It depends on whom you listen to.
The Farmer's Almanac, which has been prognosticating on weather since 1818 using "mathematical and astronomical" formulas, predicts a colder than average winter from the Continental Divide east to the Appalachians. West of the Rockies, in mid-Atlantic states and in the Southeast everything is predicted to be "near-normal."
Is that normal-normal or the new-normal, as some would have it?
And if you're in the Great Lakes, Midwest and up toward New England, brace for colder than average winter days and more precipitation than you usually shovel. The Pacific Northwest, according to the new Farmer's Almanac, will be snowy, snowy and snowy.
On their map, they predict the region of the upper Plains including Colorado as what will be "teeth-chattering cold, plentiful snow."

Thu
18
Oct

Row and spiral eaters

There I was, sitting with Beecher and my sister, Annie, at the dinner table. Terrific entrée accented by some Olathe sweet corn.
Nothing says diversity at the dinner table like observing how everyone eats an ear of corn. Annie goes round and round, from end to end, like a blade on a piece of wood turned on a lathe. Beecher goes round the big end just a bit, then switches to the across method, like a typewriter. I start on the left, go across to the right and repeat, 100 percent typewriter method.
There's no telling why people would go round and round and round. Or partially around and then across. The corn-shaped little dish that holds the butter is flat. And when you put the cob down, if it is uneven in any way - one side with kernels, one without - then it can tip and and part of the cob without kernels will soak in the butter.
As long as you have complete rows, you can always soak the remaining corn in butter without soaking the bare cob.

Thu
18
Oct

Swimming bears and turning 60 in dog years

The county commissioners decided to hold more meetings before making a decision about winter use, plowing and access rights on County Road 5 and about a proposed trail system for county roads 5, 7 and 9. At this rate, the county commissioners might make a decision by the time the snow melts in April.

Thu
18
Oct

Uphill climb for trail group

The Ouray Trail Group faces an uphill climb this month. The Ouray Ranger District set a Sept. 1 deadline to remove the staircase OTG erected on the west end of Box Canyon Park or face having the ORD remove the staircase and recycle it. There didn't seem to be any "ifs, ands or buts" when it came to this directive. The staircase was funded by an anonymous donor to the tune of $30,000-plus.
We reported last week that in May the acting district ranger, Sabrina Flores, was in attendance for a field trip to the staircase with City of Ouray officials, representatives of a private landowner and a county commissioner.
No members of the Ouray Trail Group, which puts in 5,000 hours a year maintaining one of the best, if not the best, local trail system in the state, was invited along on this field trip. The trip was to designed to give Flores the lay of the land and help her make a determination on the future of the staircase.

Thu
18
Oct

Ouray council owns the Chamber issue now

From 2012 to 2014, I served on the Ridgway Chamber's board of directors. The last year, perhaps because it was my turn, I was elected president. Six of those nine months were the most stressful, sleepless nights of tossing and turning I've had since moving back to my home state in 2010.
The reason? Money. The chamber had none. In fact, the chamber was in arrears. As an organization, we were in the hole for the first nine months, so much so that I tossed and turned most nights wondering if I was going to have to be the one to tell our members that their money was gone.
This was before the the town raised the lodging and occupancy tax, in 2015, which nearly tripled the amount of money flowing into the chamber's coffers.

Thu
18
Oct

Wishing on the City fountains

I'm sure, what with water restrictions in both municipalities, that no one would water their lawn, or the sidewalk, or the street on a Monday or off days. Right?

The funny thing about watering those sidewalks and streets is they just don't get any greener.

I saw someone in Ouray watering the Uncompahgre River last week from the east side of the city. It's an interesting technique. First, water the sidewalk and street until they are saturated. This should take about three seconds. Then, watch as the water runs downhill all the way to the river. There you have it — you're a self-made water replenishment system. Maybe the city should adopt this system. It could water the pool parking lot with pool discharge water and watch it run off into the river, skipping this whole tedious business of getting approval from CDPHE.

Sat
22
Sep

Day would be proud

Dear Editor,
It is that time of the year for renewing my subscription to the Ouray County Plaindealer. And in the memory of David F. Day, who began a publication in Ouray called the Solid Muldoon almost 140 years ago, I take my hats off (I have more than one) to Mr. Todd and Beecher Threatt for continuing the legacy. You need not apologize in taking second for "best in class." It certainly was no "egg (whole-yoke) in the face."
What is most disturbing is the "big boys" of the printed page amalgamating every small-town weekly into nondescript oblivion. The danger is in losing that camaraderie and community spirit that can only be found in a publication like the Plaindealer. Where else can you find a "yellow brick road" where everyone is rushing to make a "deposit” (not a banking term in this context)? Hey. These are bonafide issues.

Sat
22
Sep

Only 18 months

Dear Editor,
Did you know that a 33-year-old man who seduces your 15-year-old daughter has committed only a misdemeanor? And that his only punishment may be 18 months of probation and sex offender classes—after which he is removed from the sex offender registry?
Apparently the District Attorney prosecuting Travis Buck for statutory rape considered it so unlikely that he’d get a conviction in this county that he was better off giving Mr. Buck this plea deal—a mere slap on the wrist for sexually assaulting a child. Did the DA think a conviction so unlikely because a Ouray County jury would sympathize with this statutory rapist? Really? Or was the investigation into the crime so belated and sloppy that the DA lacked the necessary evidence to convict?

Sat
22
Sep

“Reds Under the Beds” and schoolteachers in the streets

The headline in The New York Times (April 26, 2018) read, “Teachers in Arizona and Colorado Walk Out Over Education Funding.” The story opened with news of a walkout that caused hundred of public schools in Arizona to shut down and “turned the streets of Downtown Phoenix into seas of crimson….”
Teachers, students and sympathizers wearing red T-shirts and chanting “Red for ED” marched to the State Capitol.
Red for Ed! For those of us old enough to remember Joseph McCarthy and catchy Cold War slogans like “Better dead than red,” such a chant issuing from street demonstrations in Denver and Phoenix seems farfetched.
FAKE NEWS!
I lived in Phoenix. My first job was in Phoenix. Teaching.
Oh sure, antiwar and civil rights demonstrations happened on college campuses back in the day, but they DO NOT happen in Arizona in this day and age. Or Colorado.
Do they?

Sat
22
Sep

Access is what it's all about

We don't kid ourselves around the ol' newspaper about the tenuous nature of legal notices being required to be published with us.
Government entities are required to publish notices in the dominant medium serving that area. In return, newspapers offer a vehicle of transparency for the public, a verification that governments are doing what they are supposed to do. Likewise, many court-related orders require legal notice postings in the newspaper. You'll find an example of that in the "Summons by Publication" on page 14 in this issue.

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