FEATURE COVERAGE

Mon
18
Mar

The winter nomad


by Sue Hirshman
with Kent Nelson


The Pine Siskin is
  an Irruptive Species

Thu
28
Feb

Paradox provides opportunity for first-time ice climbers

Paradox Sports hosted its annual adaptive ice climbing event at the Ouray Ice Park last weekend. The event featured more than 50 climbers, 16 of whom had never climbed ice before.

Courtesy photo


by Dalton Carver
dalton@ouraynews.com

Mon
11
Feb

Woodhouse’s jay

The Western scrub jay's name is now Woodhouse's scrub jay.

Photo courtesy of Sue Hirshman


by Sue Hirshman
with Kent Nelson


Every turn out-of-doors becomes
  full of delight and surprises
     about birds.
   —Birds in the Bush

Thu
24
Jan

Ridgway Reservoir: The faucet of the Uncompahgre River

A crowd gathers at the dedication ceremony for the Dallas Creek project, now known as Ridgway Reservoir. Construction for the project began in 1978 and was completed in 1987. The dam was filled in 1990 and is managed by the Tri-County Water Conservancy District.

Photo courtesy of Joan Chismire


by Dalton Carver
dalton@ouraynews.com


Inspired by the reemergence of history at Blue Mesa Reservoir in Gunnison County, the Plaindealer was interested to know what may sleep beneath the pool of our local water reserve, Ridgway Reservoir. This story, focusing on the history of the reservoir and dam, is the second of three that will revisit the reservoir’s impact and history on Ouray County.

Fri
04
Jan

The Magnificent Rosies

A rosy finch.

Photo courtesy of Sue Hirshman


by Sue Hirshman
with Kent Nelson


Living on the tundra makes them
 Optimistic little creatures
 Living the gospel of,
 “Come storm or sunshine all is well”
       --From Birds of America—

Mon
19
Nov

The fearless little gnatcatcher

The blue-gray gnatcatcher.

Courtesy photo


by Sue Hirshman
with Kent Nelson


 Miracles come in
 Small Packages
 —Anonymous

Thu
04
Oct

THE MINE NEXT DOOR: PART 10

 

 

 

 

 

 

Old Mine, New Tricks

Prospecting for Innovation at the Idarado Mine

Part 10 in “The Mine Next Door” Series

by Samantha Tisdel Wright

The mining camps of the San Juans were the innovation boot camps of the late 1800s – the Silicon Valley of their time. The mountains, and the mines, were full of challenges looking for solutions.

Some of the most distinguished innovators of the era came here to solve them – from Otto Mears, the “Pathfinder of the San Juans”, to Lucien Nunn, Nicolai Tesla and George Westinghouse, the founders of the Ames Power Plant and AC electricity.

The old-school miners whose names have been lost in time were brilliant innovators too, solving problems on the fly with their wits, their brawn, and whatever tools they had on hand.

Thu
04
Oct

THE MINE NEXT DOOR: PART 9

 

 

 

 

 

 

Like Water for Power
Building Bridges (and Pipelines) at Bridal Veil Falls

Part 9 in The Mine Next Door series

by Samantha Tisdel Wright

Thu
04
Oct

THE MINE NEXT DOOR: PART 8

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Legacy of Land
… And Other Perks of Having a Mining Giant in Your Back Yard

Part 8 in “The Mine Next Door” Series

by Samantha Tisdel Wright

Just past a tight S-curve at mile post 82 on Red Mountain Pass – up above Idarado’s old company houses – there’s a little hill that the Idarado Mine blasted flat for a scenic overlook.

If you go up there on a quiet autumn day, you can almost imagine Fred Searls, Jr., Fred Wise and Johnny Wise standing off to one side, hands stuffed in pockets, peering out at the remnants of the mine they helped spawn all those years ago.

Back in the 1940s and ‘50s, Idarado’s founding fathers bought up thousands of acres’ worth of historic mining claims in the Red Mountain and Telluride area and stitched them together into the biggest mine that ever existed in the San Juan Mountains.

Thu
04
Oct

THE MINE NEXT DOOR: PART 7

 

 

 

 

 

Windows in Time
Historic Preservation at the Idarado Mine

Part 7 in The Mine Next Door series

By Samantha Tisdel Wright

Master carpenter Loren Lew balanced on the steep, ramshackle roof of the old Lewis Mill, chainsaw in hand, on a summer morning in 2002. His mission: to stabilize this marmot high-rise at the head of Bridal Veil Basin, even as it was falling apart in slow motion all around him.

So little time, so many of these old mining relics worth preserving.

“Where do we start?” Lew wondered out loud. The time-varnished building popped and creaked its inscrutable response. There was no instruction manual for a project like this. No safety net to catch Lew if the beam he stood on collapsed from rot.

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