Columns

Fri
09
Feb
atodd's picture

Guns do kill

“It’s something we all say does not happen in small communities, although we found out today it does.”
Joe Tackitt, Wilson County Sheriff, Sutherland Springs, Texas, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2017

Fri
09
Feb
atodd's picture

On the road in Utah: an amazing state of mind, body and spiritual awakening

We eased on down Utah’s “Blue Highways,” drifting like sand in the wind, eddying up here and there without plan nor purpose, living the “good life” like a couple of peripatetic hobos with stolen credit cards.
After wandering San Raphael’s barren slot-canyoned Swell, we caught up with Ms Autumn in Capitol Reef. Gnarly old Cottonwoods stood in line along the banks of the Freemont, leaves of gold palpitating in the breeze. Necks craned skyward at sheer, sky-piercing, buff red walls. On top rested massive domes of white, thrones fit for the gods. Overwhelmed by goose bumps and the pervasive spiritual aura, my agnostic tendencies can’t help but teeter.

Fri
09
Feb
atodd's picture

So, who do you believe?

So, who do you believe?
Chuck Smith, writing for Coloradopolitics.com in July, cited a few studies stating that not only have traffic accidents in Colorado not increased since recreational marijuana has been legalized in the state, they actually have decreased. He went on to say that there was an immediate decline in car deaths following legalization.
On the other hand, an NBC report said that in a study across 20 states where marijuana sales have been legalized, weed was detected at three times the rate in the bodies of dead drivers compared to those in the year prior to legalization.
Seems this argument has been going back and forth for years.
Maybe, in the infancy of legalization, there's not enough recognition of the effects of this drug.

Mon
06
Nov

There’s no substitute for laziness

If you've missed any of our reporting over the last year or so as it relates specifically to recent sexual assault cases in Ouray County, no worries. A local neighboring publication, printed weekly and tossed hither and thither, took the liberty of lifting our work and ever so gently massaging it into their own last week.
But Alan, you say, you reprint snippets from the Gunnison, Lake City, Silverton and Montrose papers. And you've been known to reprint entire stories from a few of these publications.
Oh, so true, our ever watchful reader. We have a working relationship with these papers and willingly trade back and forth. When we reference other area papers, we use it to augment our own work, not as the roux for our gumbo. And when we reprint entire stories, we reprint entire stories. No changes. No trying to make it look like our own. Full attribution and permission.

Mon
06
Nov

The man who invented nature—a postmodern parable

Ecocide: “the extensive damage to…ecosystem(s) of a given territory…to such an extent that peaceful enjoyment by inhabitants of that territory has been or will be severely diminished.”
  ~Wikipedia

Mon
06
Nov

On transitions and numbered days

So deep into August I can almost feel September’s cool breath upon my neck. Children are headed back to school where they belong, ruing the loss of summer and freedom as they gaze out classroom windows. Moms and Dads fair worse in work ruts, pondering with puppy-love fondness a recent vacation to Lovely Ouray, grieving the funeral procession of the 50 abysmal weeks that stands between them and a return to paradise. Ouranians know the days of summer are numbered when they can find a parking spot on Main Street.

Mon
06
Nov

Jumping clear out of his trailer

When Winifred Colby of Montrose fell ill while attending the last day of the Highgraders Holiday a few Sundays ago in Ouray, she was later most distraught about not being able to find out who won the events. She was helped to her car, she said, by Ouray resident, mining veteran and firefighter Steve Martinez and made her way home.
This week, she called me to get a copy of the paper with the results, insisting to pay for it.
Winifred — I'll use her first name because I can't imagine she's ever met a stranger — is 80 years old and told me that she can't remember what she had for breakfast, but she remembers long-ago details as crisply as a fall day.
Her father, Bud Wood, was a firefighter in Pueblo. He was also a war-time trainer, and one of his tasks was to teach Western Slope firefighters how to handle Japanese incendiary bombs.
"They flew them here on balloons, you know," Winifred told me.
No, I didn't know.

Mon
06
Nov

A redundant river runs though it

Joe from New Jersey, one of our many subscribers who doesn't live here, comes here often and thinks about our area even more often, renewed his subscription this week.
He said to "tell Ouray hello."
I think he means in the general sense, the one that translates to, sure, there are beautiful parts of New Jersey, but then there's Ouray.

Mon
06
Nov

A Sixth Extinction—fair warning or fake news?

A new National Academy of Sciences study concludes the planet is facing a real threat of “biological annihilation.” The scientists who carried out the research call the decimation of the world’s large mam- mals a “global epidemic” and say the rate of decline is accelerating.
Up to 50 percent of all individual ani- mals have been lost in recent decades. Two-fifths of the 177 mammal species sur- veyed lost more than 80 percent of their range or geographic distribution between 1900 and 2016.
The release of this study coincides with news that the world’s population has reached an all-time high of 7.6 billion. In Asia, the world’s most populous continent, three-fourths of the mammal species sur- veyed have lost 80 percent of their range in the last century or so.
The fact that animal and human popu- lations are moving in opposite directions is unsettling but not surprising.

Mon
06
Nov

Kosmikophobia, or your ticker?

I was told this week a big, fat, hairy rumor. Maybe rumor is too harsh. Let's call it a belief — that there have been grizzly sightings up on Owl Creek Pass.
Not grizzled, as in older vacationers with silvery beards. We're talking the 600-lb. variety of ursus arctos horribilis, brown bear, Kodiak bear. You get the idea. Something that requires a lot of berries...and a few more vacationers...than our beloved black bear.
I immediately said Sasquatch had a bet- ter chance of being spotted up there than a grizzly, but I was looked at like I'm some sort of transplant with an accent.
For the record, I'm not a transplant, but I do have a slight accent.
I referred again to Colorado Parks and Wildlife, clawing at the issue to find out if they are hiding this whole covert grizzly operation from the public, just as one of their sister government agencies is keeping the facts of UFOs from us.

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