Columns

Sun
17
Mar
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Magstadt: Malthus, Mother Nature, and the "Myth" of Climate Change

The headline in the New York Times reads "Thin snowpack in West signals summer of drought." The reporter, Jack Healy, was in Denver. There's an aerial photograph of the mountains north of us, around Vail and Aspen. Not much snow on the ground.
Healy: "After enduring last summer's destructive drought, farmers, ranchers and officials across the parched Western states had hoped that plentiful winter snows would replenish the lakes and refill their rivers, breaking the grip of one of the worst dry spells in American history. No such luck."

Fri
22
Feb
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Junkins: Laughter in relationships

After God created the world, He created man and woman.
And then to keep the whole thing from collapsing, 
He created humor. --Ernie  Hoberecht
Laughter is in many ways one of life’s greatest mysteries. It’s commonly seen as an everyday fact of life, but not one that is understood. Laughter happens, and people like it but they do not emphasize its importance. While studies have found it is the primary reason for choosing a mate, people generally take laughter in their relationships for granted until it’s not around. Then they really miss it.
The role of laughter in relationships is often unclear and that makes it difficult to regain it once it is lost. People tend to bog down in the serious issues of everyday life like money, children and work. With their noses to the grindstone, they may be aware that life has ceased to be fun but they can’t identify the cause. They don’t tune in to the fact that they are no longer laughing.

Fri
22
Feb
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McLachlan: It's time for a conversation on guns

This week, the House Judiciary Committee heard two measures which I ultimately supported that have generated more unilateral messaging than any other issue to date since my election. Overwhelmingly, my constituents and many others have been distressed about my votes in favor of expanded background check for firearms and magazine limitations.

Fri
22
Feb
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Johnson: Organ Pipe: "The most dangerous national park" in America

Lukeville, Ariz.: I’m currently in “Roving Reporter” mode, taking a shorts and t-shirt break from Lovely Ouray’s long-John winter. Try not to hold that against me (grin). This column comes to you from Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument—way, way down on the border of Meh-hee-co—where I’m immersed in a lush volcanic desert landscape that begs exploration. That’s what our National Parks are for, right? Well, not so fast. Almost 70 percent of Organ Pipe has been closed since 2002. That’s when Park Ranger Kris Eggle was shot and killed by drug runners armed with AK-47s.

Fri
08
Feb
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Billings: It's always something

Life is filled with metaphors…and how horses interact in the pasture is a metaphor for life.  

Thu
31
Jan
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Alaimo: My iShovel buried your butterfly drone with snow

Follow the news or Facebook lately and one would think we are living in an age of terror on the brink of collapse. Armed Crazies, GMOs, Fracking, Global Warming, Government Conspiracies, and who knows what else. Someday when I feel brave I will weigh in on those but for today let me say that sometimes I agree we are a destructive mess—other times I am not so sure. Sometimes I think we are living in an age of generosity and wonder. This month’s science sure makes me feel that way.

Thu
31
Jan
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The Hall is missing a good one

In 1900, a 10-year-old boy and his family traveled by wagon across the Kansas plains into Colorado and settled in the still-wild mining town of Ouray. Howard Wood, born in Kansas City in 1889, was nicknamed 'Joe' after a circus clown. He kept that moniker until he died in 1985 at the age of 95, when he was the last living major league baseball player to have played in the majors prior to 1910.
His highest vote total for the Hall of Fame was 18 percent. It certainly can be argued that he deserves the honor. But the shroud of scandal kept Hall voters away. In that, he shares a common thread with four of the game's greatest players ever, who themselves may never get into the Hall.

Thu
17
Jan
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Johnson: The Geography of Happiness and “The Paradox of Choice?”

It fell to me unexpectedly, the honor of toasting “in” the New Year. With mind and lips numb from the better part of a growler of “Hillary” from Ourayle House, I raised my glass and paused. It was dramatic…deliberate…full of intention and promise that something profound was about to be imparted. Let’s face it; some people are not suited for the spotlight. Blank of mind, I succumbed to the old standard: “To our health and happiness. Cheers!”
Perhaps it was fitting, because “health and happiness” has become my standard New Year's resolution of late. I like how general and undemanding it is, as opposed to onerous things like, “lose ten pounds,” or, “write a novel.” The “health” part is simple enough for that’s something I do anyway. But “happiness” is becoming more elusive and fleeting in today’s impersonal, device ridden culture…where “Satisfaction” is more dependent upon “upgrades” and “smart-stuff” than relationships. Why?

Fri
11
Jan
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Billings: New snow and a new year

Ah….snow, glorious snow…..all I can say is that we need the moisture. Other than that…..for me…it isn’t that great. Makes it much more difficult to do things on the ranch. Already this season, I have fallen twice…..so now courtesy of a dear friend, I have a pair of “Yak Traks.” They are great. I know for all you skiers, this snow is a blessing. We all have a different perspective. And isn’t that a marvelous thing. We have so many differences, but we are united by what we have in common. And that makes it all worthwhile.

Fri
11
Jan
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Magstadt: Life will be beautiful in 2013…but will we be any better?

It's the start of a new year, which means we've put the old year behind us now. We can forget all about the disappointments of 2012 and start afresh.
Things will be different from now on. Just wait and see.
We will be nicer to each other, more considerate of our neighbors and more honest with ourselves. We will not spoil our children, brag about them on bumper stickers or tell them how "special" they are so often (or in the face of mounting evidence to contrary) that it ceases to have any meaning, becomes galling to others and drives many of our best schoolteachers out of the profession and into another more rewarding line of work.

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