Columns

Sat
22
Sep

Misleading headline? Really?

We don't mind being corrected. It's not a big deal. In fact, it's part of what we signed on to do.
So when a county commissioner just blurts out during an open meeting in front of the public that we misrepresented a conversation, he should be able tell us at least one thing we got wrong. Right?
Wrong.
Tuesday, County Commissioner Ben Tisdel told the other commissioners, a sizable crowd and anyone else who cared for an opinion devoid of facts, that our article entitled "Road committee steers commissioners in direction of tax increase" (April 5, 2018), lacked accuracy.
Problem is, when asked during a break in the meeting what it was we got wrong, he couldn't say. He said unspecified town and city council members were erroneously led to believe the county was planning a new round of sales tax, and even though that very prospect was raised during that meeting, as we reported, Tisdel said that was misleading.

Sat
22
Sep

Going broke in Holyoke

We can't win 'em all, and never has that been more true than in recent months in this newspaper business of ours.
For starters, at the annual Colorado Press Association convention this week, we won our share of awards - perhaps more.
But we didn't win the big one.
We were shooting for our third straight year of being named best in our class, which judges us against newspapers our size in Colorado. We walked away with the Editorial Excellence award, but got bested by the Holyoke Enterprise for best in class.
Admittedly, I don't know nuthin' about that paper. And, even though I was born in the Centennial State and have traveled around most of it, I had to do the Google on the intraweb to find Holyoke on the map.
It would be one thing to be beat out by the Post or Gazette, or even the Daily Sentinel for that matter. At least I'd know what we were up against.
But Holyoke? That's like going into the ring blindfolded.

Sat
22
Sep

Breaking the chains of routine, “flying exultantly under the stars”

“We find after years of struggle that we do not take a trip; a trip takes us." John Steinbeck: “Travels With Charley.”

Sat
22
Sep

One toke over the state line

In its "Perspective" section Sunday, journalists at the Denver Post came out swinging at their owner, Digital First Media. Headlines blazed with revolt against the venture capitalist firm that will lay off another two dozen newsroom employees this week, piling up over seven dozen layoffs in that department in the past three years.
"Colo. should demand the newspaper it deserves," read one headline. "Who will step up and save The Denver Post?" read another. "Journalists don't protest. But this time is different," read yet another.
The pride of the Post, a 125-year Colorado tradition, has had its victories in recent years. It won the Denver and, yes, state war for newspaper dominance when the Rocky Mountain News, established in 1859, published its last edition on Feb. 27, 2009. Since 2000, the Post has won five of its nine Pulitzer Prizes, pulling down four in a row from 2010-2013.
But will its journalists win a battle with the people who hold the purse strings?

Tue
17
Apr

On the move again

Here we go again, although it's been three years since we last said that.
The lease for our 8th Avenue office is up at the end of May. We could have renewed for another three years, but it's a lot of space, and usually I'm the only one there. Literally, there are weeks where I can count on one finger the number of visitors we get. So much is done by mail, email, phone and the interweb.
The building's ownership will, from what we're told, change hands at the beginning of May, and that was the final kick to send us scurrying for office space. If you think it's difficult to find affordable housing, try affordable or available commercial space!
We found a spot, a bit tucked away, in the Old School House in Ridgway. There's a lot going on in the new building. RIGS Fly Shop is front and center. Behind it is Middleton Accounting, Kaadi Massage, Weehawken's dance classes and probably something else I haven't seen.

Tue
17
Apr

The medium is the message

I read a few things that got me thinking about the Denver Post, bloodletting, local journalism, craft beer and social media.
One was in the Colorado Springs Gazette this week, penned by its editor, Vince Bzdek. He noted how thankful he is that the Pulitzer Prize winning newspaper he works for is owned by a Coloradan who has a stake in the state and ultimately skin in the game when it comes to the Gazette and its community.
Surrounding this, Bzdek spends much of his piece hammering the ownership of the Denver Post, which recently cut 30 more newsroom positions, for a total of 75 newsroom cuts in the past three years, by what Bzdek terms a "vulture capitalist" firm, one that has also been playing Whack-A-Mole on journalists at the Oakland Tribune, the San Jose Mercury News, the St. Paul Pioneer Press and The Orange County Register.

Sun
25
Feb
atodd's picture

The enemy within

"Alan!" she pushed from the bottom of her lungs in a hurried whisper, immediately waking me from deep sleep. She rarely calls me by my name, unless there's trouble, and it's usually due to trouble that I've created.
"Alan!" she screams again in her loudest whispered tone. I give her the attention any man gives his wife at times like these…that cautioned, certain look that says something's wrong and I'm about to be told it's my fault.
"I was sitting in the living room reading and I heard the garage door open," she said.
Well, that gets me off the hook.
"Which one?" I asked, sitting up in bed, suddenly refocused on the fact that she said my name twice instead of the half-dozen or so names she uses depending on the occasion.
"Mine," she said, meaning the overhead door on the side of the garage where she pulls in.
"What time is it?" I ask.

Fri
09
Feb
atodd's picture

Couples who fly together...

Beecher and I actually left the state last week, together, on the same trip. Which meant for a brief period in time we didn't think about ink and paper.
That brief period, for me, was when we turned the corner in the Salt Lake City airport and there, past the ramp leading down to Terminal B were 2,000 of our soon-to-be closest friends.
"That's the flu waiting to happen," I popped off to my travel partner.
They say a joke is best when it is dipped in truth, and the truth hit us about three hours after our return home. It was not pretty.
If only the other 48 passengers on the plane from Salt Lake City to Grand Junction knew how lucky they were not to have had to share in our stomach flu fun.
There was another discussion we had in the airport. We were trying to list things you don't see in airports anymore.
For instance, remember the long lines of pay phones, or clusters of them? Even private phone booths? Gone.

Fri
09
Feb
atodd's picture

Love is in the air

February is the month of Valentines and Love is in the Air, or so “they” say. I don’t know who “they” are but “they” are obviously not involved with a cowboy. The activity that is brewing in the air around our home is prepping for calving season and complaining about the lack of snow. Both are topics that don’t bring strong loving feelings from me.

Fri
09
Feb
atodd's picture

Headlines: Shakespeare’s ghost stalks Colorado town

It’s the last day of 2017. New Year’s Eve. Another year is slipping away. Most of my life I’ve regretted the passing of another year. Not so much this year.

I awoke this morning with no thoughts of C.S. Lewis’s White Witch of Narnia. No thoughts of hopelessness and despair.

Blue skies. Cold sun. Frost on the windows. Snow on the ground. A good day to hunker down by the fireplace, read a good book and recover from too much of a good thing. 

Becky and I have been on the post-Christmas party circuit. Three parties in as many nights. We’re not party animals. Not by a long stretch. And this morning, I’m really not in a party mood.

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