Columns

Tue
17
Apr

On the move again

Here we go again, although it's been three years since we last said that.
The lease for our 8th Avenue office is up at the end of May. We could have renewed for another three years, but it's a lot of space, and usually I'm the only one there. Literally, there are weeks where I can count on one finger the number of visitors we get. So much is done by mail, email, phone and the interweb.
The building's ownership will, from what we're told, change hands at the beginning of May, and that was the final kick to send us scurrying for office space. If you think it's difficult to find affordable housing, try affordable or available commercial space!
We found a spot, a bit tucked away, in the Old School House in Ridgway. There's a lot going on in the new building. RIGS Fly Shop is front and center. Behind it is Middleton Accounting, Kaadi Massage, Weehawken's dance classes and probably something else I haven't seen.

Tue
17
Apr

The medium is the message

I read a few things that got me thinking about the Denver Post, bloodletting, local journalism, craft beer and social media.
One was in the Colorado Springs Gazette this week, penned by its editor, Vince Bzdek. He noted how thankful he is that the Pulitzer Prize winning newspaper he works for is owned by a Coloradan who has a stake in the state and ultimately skin in the game when it comes to the Gazette and its community.
Surrounding this, Bzdek spends much of his piece hammering the ownership of the Denver Post, which recently cut 30 more newsroom positions, for a total of 75 newsroom cuts in the past three years, by what Bzdek terms a "vulture capitalist" firm, one that has also been playing Whack-A-Mole on journalists at the Oakland Tribune, the San Jose Mercury News, the St. Paul Pioneer Press and The Orange County Register.

Sun
25
Feb
atodd's picture

The enemy within

"Alan!" she pushed from the bottom of her lungs in a hurried whisper, immediately waking me from deep sleep. She rarely calls me by my name, unless there's trouble, and it's usually due to trouble that I've created.
"Alan!" she screams again in her loudest whispered tone. I give her the attention any man gives his wife at times like these…that cautioned, certain look that says something's wrong and I'm about to be told it's my fault.
"I was sitting in the living room reading and I heard the garage door open," she said.
Well, that gets me off the hook.
"Which one?" I asked, sitting up in bed, suddenly refocused on the fact that she said my name twice instead of the half-dozen or so names she uses depending on the occasion.
"Mine," she said, meaning the overhead door on the side of the garage where she pulls in.
"What time is it?" I ask.

Fri
09
Feb
atodd's picture

Couples who fly together...

Beecher and I actually left the state last week, together, on the same trip. Which meant for a brief period in time we didn't think about ink and paper.
That brief period, for me, was when we turned the corner in the Salt Lake City airport and there, past the ramp leading down to Terminal B were 2,000 of our soon-to-be closest friends.
"That's the flu waiting to happen," I popped off to my travel partner.
They say a joke is best when it is dipped in truth, and the truth hit us about three hours after our return home. It was not pretty.
If only the other 48 passengers on the plane from Salt Lake City to Grand Junction knew how lucky they were not to have had to share in our stomach flu fun.
There was another discussion we had in the airport. We were trying to list things you don't see in airports anymore.
For instance, remember the long lines of pay phones, or clusters of them? Even private phone booths? Gone.

Fri
09
Feb
atodd's picture

Love is in the air

February is the month of Valentines and Love is in the Air, or so “they” say. I don’t know who “they” are but “they” are obviously not involved with a cowboy. The activity that is brewing in the air around our home is prepping for calving season and complaining about the lack of snow. Both are topics that don’t bring strong loving feelings from me.

Fri
09
Feb
atodd's picture

Headlines: Shakespeare’s ghost stalks Colorado town

It’s the last day of 2017. New Year’s Eve. Another year is slipping away. Most of my life I’ve regretted the passing of another year. Not so much this year.

I awoke this morning with no thoughts of C.S. Lewis’s White Witch of Narnia. No thoughts of hopelessness and despair.

Blue skies. Cold sun. Frost on the windows. Snow on the ground. A good day to hunker down by the fireplace, read a good book and recover from too much of a good thing. 

Becky and I have been on the post-Christmas party circuit. Three parties in as many nights. We’re not party animals. Not by a long stretch. And this morning, I’m really not in a party mood.

Fri
09
Feb
atodd's picture

Predictions for Ouray County for 2018

Every year publications pull together a "year in review." We published one the first year we were here, perhaps the second, but haven't done one since. Reasons: everyone does it; it’s “easy” filler; and, we wonder how interesting it is to readers.
This year, we thought it would be more interesting to prognosticate on the year to come for Ouray County. Below, in our order of importance, are our predictions as to what will be the top issues and solutions to come for 2018. Have a different opinion? Send us your prognostications in a letter to the editor (under 500 words) to atodd@ouraynews.com.

Fri
09
Feb
atodd's picture

A time for stuffing stockings…and taking stock

As the end of 2017 fast approaches, it’s a natural time to look back, but it’s also a time to look ahead. Optimists are inclined always to look ahead. Pessimists are just the opposite. History is replete with wars and natural disasters and wrong turns.
Optimists tend to dislike and dismiss pessimists as dour and depressing. Expect the worst and it will happen. See the best in people and good things will happen.
Pessimists believe optimists are naïve and “in denial” about everything from human nature and social justice to the prospects for peace on earth and the seesawing price of gas at the pump.
Where you sit on the pessimism-optimism scale at any given time likely reflects where you stand on the political spectrum. Thus, the overwhelming majority of President Trump’s supporters are giddy optimists. And why not? The stock market is hitting historic highs!

Fri
09
Feb
atodd's picture

The final turnstile: Tribute to a fallen matriarch

"Sooner or later you come back for that which (is) stored away, and sometimes it isn't there."  

~ Off Ramp, Hank Stuever...Adventures and heartache in the American elsewhere.

Fri
09
Feb
atodd's picture

What a city, Ouray!

What a city!
Last week I had a late night and lost a piece of clothing in the process.
Oh, you're thinking sure, Alan, you're going to tell us you were at the Coachlight Tavern and things got out of hand, right?
Not exactly.
I went to the Ice Park Committee meeting.
And it was quite the blur, so much so that the next day I looked all around for the new black fleece pullover my mother-in-law bought me and couldn't find it anywhere.
I searched the house, the office and even 6th Avenue where I had parked. I texted someone at the city and stopped by the police department to check on lost and found.
Nothing.
The next morning I was dropping Beecher off at City Hall and looked across the street. There on a railing was a black piece of clothing. I walked across and, lo and behold, there was my fleece.

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