Opinions

Wed
12
Aug
atodd's picture

Right down the middle


Dear Editor,
I was somewhat perplexed by the recent letter from John W. Nelson about his view of the political stance of the Plaindealer over the last 20 years. I have been a subscriber to the Plaindealer  for more than 20 years. I have always been very impressed at the way this newspaper has covered controversial topics. I have never seen any bias toward one political ideology or another during this time. Over the past 20 years the Plaindealer has been a frequent winner of prestigious awards from the Colorado Press Association.This includes the years when David Mullings was the publisher and continues today under the leadership of Alan Todd and Beecher Threatt.

Don Paulson
Ouray County
 

Wed
12
Aug
atodd's picture

Medicare is afraid of the sunlight

Wed
12
Aug
atodd's picture

A river of toxic tears

As the Environmental Pollution Agency — as it is being referred to anywhere downstream of Silverton — tripled the estimate of toxic water spill this week from the Gold King Mine into Cement Creek, a tributary of the Animas River, the Animas was passing its orange glow from Colorado into New Mexico.
Eerily, Dave Taylor of Farmington, New Mexico, wrote the Silverton Standard and The Miner a few weeks ago and virtually predicted this disaster. Taylor, a professional geologist for 47 years, concluded that the Environmental Protection Agency’s efforts to divert leakage from the mine to holding pools would absolutely result in catastrophe.
Taylor predicted the effort to plug the 500 gallons per minute of exfiltrating water from the mine would backfill the interconnected mine system in the region, and within "seven to 120 days," he wrote, all of the 500 gallons per minute would seep out through new waterways.

Wed
12
Aug
atodd's picture

Mine waste must be addressed

Asking anyone in Silverton, Colo., how the past week has gone would be like ask- ing Mrs. Lincoln how she enjoyed the play.
The disaster that unfolded last week has thrust the problem of acid-mine drainage leaking from abandoned mines in the spectacular San Juans into the national — and even global — spotlight.
The bad publicity so many local busi- ness owners feared from a possible Superfund designation could not possibly match this.
The ugly, orange blob of mine waste that burst through the Gold King portal Aug. 5 also burst a lot of notions about the scope and urgency of the problem that the region has been struggling with for years.
It’s a complex problem with no easy or cheap solutions. And when it comes down to it, the biggest fight has been over who is responsible and who should pay.

Wed
12
Aug
atodd's picture

Up where snow “melts into music”: A hypocrite’s lament

“Keep close to Nature's heart... break clear away once in awhile... climb a mountain or spend a week in the woods. Wash your spirit clean.” (JohnMuir)
It is a Chamber of Commerce morning, and I’m delightfully alone in lofty mountains above Lovely Ouray. The air is unusually warm and close, as cotton-ball clouds already build on ragged peak horizons. Sunlight dapples off rip- pled stream and glints from eyes overflowing with awe, bathing my aged-to-imperfect skin in solar bliss. I ponder the intense light, the staggering energy of its source and the speed at which it trav- els—93 million miles in eight minutes flat. I could almost lie down amongst the wildflowers at my feet and take a nap. Who would know?

Sat
18
Jul
atodd's picture

Vacationing close to home

They say you're a lucky guy or gal if you get to live where you vacation. Of course, when you work where you vacation, the former can overshadow the latter.
Which makes a weekend overshadow the former.
We loaded the pop up and worn-but-reliable SUV and headed to a whole other world — the Cimarron Mountains.
No detours, no one-lane traffic, just turn right on County Road 10, pass Second Chance Animal Shelter and the RAT bike trail and you're in a different world almost immediately.
About 14 miles up we bumped and bounced the little camper slowly behind us past Deb's Meadow, wound our way up to Owl Creek Pass at 10,114 feet, then worked our way behind the Turrets to land an ideal camping spot at the end of the road right on the Middle Fork of the Cimarron.

Sat
18
Jul
atodd's picture

Look again: That mountain may be a molehill…

Summer always makes me think of lakes and mountains – and mountain lakes.
My college roommate from Alaska spent a few days at the cabin recently. Mike is a retired physician battling Parkinson’s now, but he’s doing pretty well and hasn’t lost his lust for adventure or his sense of humor. People facing challenges, whether climbing a mountain or combating a chronic illness, are an inspiration.
Mike grew up in a place called Mountain Lake, Minnesota (population: 2,104; elevation: 1,302 ft.). There are lots of lakes in Minnesota (even the license plates proclaim it: “Land of 10,000 Lakes”), but there isn’t a mountain anywhere near Mountain Lake.
When I asked Mike how the town got its name, he just shrugged and said, “Oh, there’s a little hill there.” Even the town’s official motto, “Home on the prairie,” betrays its inapt appellation.

Thu
02
Jul
atodd's picture

Coordinators needed

Dear Editor,
Ouray County Cares sponsored by Ridgway Community Pride is looking for a few good people to coordinate the annual holiday program providing gifts, food and toys to families in need. This program is entirely volunteer driven, is well funded and gets extensive support from all areas of the community including individual volunteers, businesses and county entities.
Some of the existing coordinators have been involved for many years and, due to circumstances in their lives, will be unable to continue. All new coordinators will be mentored to insure a seamless transition. Ninety-five percent of the work occurs between October and December, so it is not a volunteer position requiring a lot of commitment throughout the year.

Thu
02
Jul
atodd's picture

A compassionate weekend

Dear Editor,
Twenty years ago we saw how special Ouray County was. This past weekend was another example of loving your neighbor by helping them. This is called Compassion Weekend. Ten hardworking people arrived at our house and proceeded to dig out the weeds underneath our trees and put mulch around them. Another group took bricks that we had and outlined the two flower gardens. Another group stacked all the firewood that was in a pile on the back of our property. These are jobs that my husband Dick and I could no longer do.
We are so appreciative to organizers Terry and Sabrina Butler and their whole crew of willing volunteers that have helped many people in our wonderful county.

Dick and M-E Spirek
Ridgway
 

Thu
02
Jul
atodd's picture

Healthy river takes patience

A long-time flyfisherman told Eric Gardunio, aquatic biologist in Montrose, that back in the 1980s the sight of four-pound Rainbow trout smacking big, puffy flies on the surface of the Gunnison River throughout summer was common.
"You just don't see that now," Gardunio said.
Overcoming whirling disease has been an uphill battle. Caused by a parasite that disrupts the nervous system of a Rainbow, the disease has decimated Rainbow populations throughout the West. The disease makes feeding nearly impossible and renders young Rainbows vulnerable to predators.
One predator is the Brown trout, which minus a healthy population of Rainbows has grown to dominate the lower Gunnison River.

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