FEATURE COVERAGE

Thu
15
Sep

Long distance runners endure mountain pass

by Tori Sheets

tori@ouraynews.com

 

Runners in the Imogene Pass Run headed out of Ouray early Saturday morning and traveled 17.1 miles over the mountain pass into Telluride. This year marks the 42nd time runners have participated in the grueling run over Imogene Pass. 

This year the weather was fairly mild compared to previous runs. In past years runners have had to trudge through rain, wind, fog and even snow along the course. Saturday the pass remained sunny and only a little chilly.

Volunteers at six aid stations along the route offered water, sports drinks and support to the runners. The Ouray cross country team bolstered the spirit of the runners by running up the pass before the race began and handing out drinks at the Harris Bridge Aid Station. 

Wed
17
Aug

Ouray historic cabin history questioned

by Tori Sheets

tori@ouraynews.com

 

One Ouray native is on a quest to correct historical information about a cabin at the Ouray County Historical Museum that he believes is inaccurate.  

Bill Crawford contacted Ouray County Historical Society to let them know he thinks the history on a cabin known as the Raab/Sly cabin is incorrect. According to the historical society, the cabin was built in 1905 and donated to the museum in 1971. The plaque on the cabin says it originally stood off Main Street between 9th Avenue and the Hot Springs Pool. The museum's website also says it may have been part of Ouray's "Red Light" district. 

Sat
30
Jul

Buried history close to home

by Tori Sheets

tori@ouraynews.com

 

Most people's front yards house gardens, pets or lawn furniture, but one Ouray resident enjoys the company of her deceased relatives close by. 

Coleen McElroy inherited the family cemetery from her father, who got the land from her great aunt. 

McElroy said her graveyard gives some people the creeps, but for her it’s just a part of life. She plans on being buried there along with all of her family who wish to spend the afterlife nestled along the banks of Dexter Creek.

"We'll all be out here, my mother and my sister, it's just not an option to go anywhere else," she said. 

Fri
15
Jul

Young actors learn the best of Shakespeare

by Tori Sheets
tori@ouraynews.com

Young thespians are getting an opportunity to expand their skills during a two week long theatre workshop under the direction of a nationally known theater instructor.
Kathleen O'Mara has been teaching, performing and directing performances since 1992. She has worked with thousands of students across the nation and taught many workshops like the one she is now teaching at the Sherbino Theater for Weehawken Creative Arts.
This particular workshop highlights iconic portions of Shakespearean plays and will culminate with two performances at the end of the lessons. Students will deliver Hamlet's monologue, fight scenes from "The Taming of the Shrew,” the balcony scene from "Romeo and Juliet" and more.

Thu
30
Jun

Playing around with Shakespeare

Fri
24
Jun

TOWN OF RIDGWAY No ordinary guy

John Billings greets guests Thursday at the Sherbino Theater prior to the private screening of a documentary about his craft.
 

Plaindealer photo by Alan Todd


By Alan Todd
alan@ouraynews.com



John Billings was presented as "just an ordinary guy in a small town in Colorado," but after an intimate group watched a private screening of a new documentary Thursday night at Ridgway's Sherbino Theater, few were left with ordinary thoughts.
Billings, a Ridgway resident and maker of the Grammy, invited several dozen people to watch "Chasing Life: The Grammy Man Story," a one-hour documentary made by Outpost Worldwide film out of Lenexa, Kansas in association with 7 Pillar Studios in Cisco, Texas.

Wed
15
Jun

Soulful band will rock the park

by Tori Sheets
tori@ouraynews.com


Thursday's headliner for Mountain Air Music Series packs a soulful punch. Founded in Portland, Oregon, Dirty Revival is a group of seven artists whose sounds focus on funk, rock and soul.
Singer Sarah Clarke leads the band with her resounding vocals.
"It's really a unique, funky, soulful rock sound," she said. "Based off the reaction of people when we play I think we create a fun atmosphere for people."
This is the band's second trip to Colorado and their first time in Ouray. Ouray is the third stop on the group's tour of the West after their release of the self-titled album "Dirty Revival" in September 2015.  
Clarke said she is excited to play in the natural amphitheater Ouray provides.
"Nature really helps amplify the noise and it's really interesting and always very lovely," she said.

Thu
26
May

Athletes set school records at state

by Tori Sheets
tori@ouraynews.com


The boys and girls relay teams set new school records during the state track meet this weekend in Lakewood.
The boys 4 x 800 relay team of Martin Torres, Eli Hagemeyer, Joey Fedel and Nate Fedel set a record of 8:35.41 and took 5th place overall. The previous record was set by Torres, the Fedel brothers and Ravi Inmon in Pagosa Springs on May 7.
The girls 4 x 400 relay team of Jayden Miles, Holly Harrington, Bella Hines and Kayla Fairchild set a record of 4:24.68. The previous record was 4:27.06 set in 2014.
Members of the track team are from Ouray, Ridgway and Silverton. According to Bernie Pearce, Ouray Athletic Director, the school records belong to Ouray because it is the host of the shared program.

Fri
20
May

Remove food sources to avoid bear conflicts

by Tori Sheets
tori@ouraynews.com


Bears are out and about in Ouray, and Colorado Parks and Wildlife partnered with the Ouray Police Department to give a special presentation covering bear behavior and management on Thursday in the Ouray Community Center.
Kelly Crane is the CPW district wildlife officer for the Ouray area. She is in charge of bear issues in Ouray, Ridgway, a small area of Montrose and half of Telluride. Crane said in the last few years human-bear conflicts have increased because of expanded human development, learned behavior and weather events.
Between 1980 and 2010 the human population of Colorado went from 2.9 million to 5 million. According to Crane, the majority of that growth expanded into areas considered good bear habitat.

Sat
02
Apr

1940s life in Ouray preserved through photographs

By Tori Sheets
tori@ouraynews.com

The Library of Congress has an impressive online collection of Ouray County historical photos.
Some were taken by photographer Russell Lee during a visit to Ouray in September 1940 at the end of the Great Depression. Mining kept the county afloat during those times, and Lee captured the spirit of Ouray’s determination in more than 100 photos.
The photos depict everyday life in Ouray during that period. Lee photographed farmers stacking hay, sheep herders riding mules packed high with supplies and iconic buildings in Ouray that still stand today.
According to Don Paulson, curator of Ouray County Historical Museum, Lee gained his photography job through the Works Progress Administration.

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