Columns

Thu
28
Mar
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Todd: Meandering through our ancestral pages

Meandering through the ancestral pages of our great-grandparents, the Ouray Times and Ouray Herald, can be a fun way to connect to the past. It takes only one search to get me going and then I’m off to another and another. Here are a few items I ran across in pages prior to the turn of the century—the other century:
“Fred H. Andrus, wife, child and maid, of Chicago, spent several days at the Beaumont the first of the week, and enjoyed the beautiful mountain scenery of Ouray. Mr. Andrus is a member of the firm of A.G. Spalding & Co., Chicago, and in 1876 belonged to the Chicago baseball club, which won the National League pennant for the first time.”
Ouray Herald, Oct. 12, 1899, page 3

Thu
28
Mar
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Alaimo: Opening our hearts and tables

I remember growing up in Brooklyn. Every summer they would cordon off our four-square block neighborhood and throw a block party. There were fireworks, sausage and pepper hoagies, homemade Sangria and catching lightning bugs in jelly jars. It seems like every house had tables set up with food on the sidewalk and we would walk around visiting and enjoying them. Surprisingly, very few houses did not offer something and yet, as far as I could tell, everyone (regardless of whether they set up a table or not) was welcome at every other house. I also remember that next door to us there was a tiny house that looked like a beach house. The people who lived there seemed incredibly old to my pre-teen self but I loved to visit them because of their amazing library. In that little den I discovered the complete Tarzan and the Pellucidar series, plus rows of Fleming, London, Asimov, Poe, Doyle and more—all in hardback and covering the wall like thick wallpaper.

Sun
24
Mar
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Make no covenant with a dubious universe

On The Road In Chiricahua National Monument, Arizona.
An admitted “emigrant” bandying about "Californication" sounds a tad sanctimonious, if not downright hypocritical. After all, I "fornicated" Colorado back in '76. Aren’t we all “emigrants” at some point in our genealogic linage? In my defense, at least I didn't try to impose Springfield, Mo.'s Ozark mores on my new found home. On the contrary, I was running away from them…the deep-fried funnel-cake food mentality, impenetrable jungle landscape and a sprawling cityscape that began gobbling neighboring Mayberrys like Tic Tacs. I had to leave before I became one of them…certainly before I had children who most assuredly would be cursed with hillbilly drawl speech impediments.

Sun
17
Mar
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Magstadt: Malthus, Mother Nature, and the "Myth" of Climate Change

The headline in the New York Times reads "Thin snowpack in West signals summer of drought." The reporter, Jack Healy, was in Denver. There's an aerial photograph of the mountains north of us, around Vail and Aspen. Not much snow on the ground.
Healy: "After enduring last summer's destructive drought, farmers, ranchers and officials across the parched Western states had hoped that plentiful winter snows would replenish the lakes and refill their rivers, breaking the grip of one of the worst dry spells in American history. No such luck."

Fri
22
Feb
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Junkins: Laughter in relationships

After God created the world, He created man and woman.
And then to keep the whole thing from collapsing, 
He created humor. --Ernie  Hoberecht
Laughter is in many ways one of life’s greatest mysteries. It’s commonly seen as an everyday fact of life, but not one that is understood. Laughter happens, and people like it but they do not emphasize its importance. While studies have found it is the primary reason for choosing a mate, people generally take laughter in their relationships for granted until it’s not around. Then they really miss it.
The role of laughter in relationships is often unclear and that makes it difficult to regain it once it is lost. People tend to bog down in the serious issues of everyday life like money, children and work. With their noses to the grindstone, they may be aware that life has ceased to be fun but they can’t identify the cause. They don’t tune in to the fact that they are no longer laughing.

Fri
22
Feb
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McLachlan: It's time for a conversation on guns

This week, the House Judiciary Committee heard two measures which I ultimately supported that have generated more unilateral messaging than any other issue to date since my election. Overwhelmingly, my constituents and many others have been distressed about my votes in favor of expanded background check for firearms and magazine limitations.

Fri
22
Feb
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Johnson: Organ Pipe: "The most dangerous national park" in America

Lukeville, Ariz.: I’m currently in “Roving Reporter” mode, taking a shorts and t-shirt break from Lovely Ouray’s long-John winter. Try not to hold that against me (grin). This column comes to you from Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument—way, way down on the border of Meh-hee-co—where I’m immersed in a lush volcanic desert landscape that begs exploration. That’s what our National Parks are for, right? Well, not so fast. Almost 70 percent of Organ Pipe has been closed since 2002. That’s when Park Ranger Kris Eggle was shot and killed by drug runners armed with AK-47s.

Fri
08
Feb
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Billings: It's always something

Life is filled with metaphors…and how horses interact in the pasture is a metaphor for life.  

Thu
31
Jan
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Alaimo: My iShovel buried your butterfly drone with snow

Follow the news or Facebook lately and one would think we are living in an age of terror on the brink of collapse. Armed Crazies, GMOs, Fracking, Global Warming, Government Conspiracies, and who knows what else. Someday when I feel brave I will weigh in on those but for today let me say that sometimes I agree we are a destructive mess—other times I am not so sure. Sometimes I think we are living in an age of generosity and wonder. This month’s science sure makes me feel that way.

Thu
31
Jan
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The Hall is missing a good one

In 1900, a 10-year-old boy and his family traveled by wagon across the Kansas plains into Colorado and settled in the still-wild mining town of Ouray. Howard Wood, born in Kansas City in 1889, was nicknamed 'Joe' after a circus clown. He kept that moniker until he died in 1985 at the age of 95, when he was the last living major league baseball player to have played in the majors prior to 1910.
His highest vote total for the Hall of Fame was 18 percent. It certainly can be argued that he deserves the honor. But the shroud of scandal kept Hall voters away. In that, he shares a common thread with four of the game's greatest players ever, who themselves may never get into the Hall.

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