Columns

Thu
23
May
admin's picture

Magstadt: Natural Gas, Prairie Dog Towns, And Magical Thinking

On April 25, faculty experts from Colorado State University were in Washington, D.C., to give    Congressional staffers a briefing on natural gas extraction and hydraulic fracturing. Former Governor Bill Ritter, Jr., who is currently the director of the Center for the New Energy Economy at CSU led the panel. The briefing, called "Getting Natural Gas Right" focused on finding technologies and policies aimed at the best – most environmentally sound – ways to extract the stuff.
When it comes to fossil fuel and carbon emissions, there's simply no way to avoid controversy, but CSU as an institution is understandably at pains not to offend any- body's sensibilities: “As an academic and scientific enterprise, Colorado State does not take any side in the debate over gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing, instead preferring the role of the neutral broker," said CSU's VP for Research.

Thu
23
May
admin's picture

Johnson: Feral nose and ear hair: Up to my neck in “Golden Pond”

It’s right there in the Bible. Proverbs 16:18: “Pride goeth before the fall.” And “The Fall” sneaks up with the stealth of a practiced assassin. Next thing you know you can’t get up, and your bathtub has a chair and a door in it. Lord, I never thought I’d live long enough to get old.
It starts subtly, with receding hairlines, crow’s feet wrinkles and, most hurtful, going unnoticed (as in, invisible!) by the fairer gender. You start skipping showers, wearing the same shirt four days in a row…the one with egg yolk dribbled down the front…and wondering how the Fountain of Youth suddenly turned into a “Golden Pond.” One day you’re a tall, tanned and ruggedly handsome outdoor gent, the next, you’re standing in front of a truthful mirror, aghast at the exacting toll sun, time and gravity has taken on your body. A thousand pushups and the best haircut in the world can’t arrest “The Fall” from pride and pulchritude (sniff).

Thu
23
May
admin's picture

Alaimo: Measuring the speed of progress when sitting still

Earlier this year we switched from pretzels to popcorn at the Still. A simple switch and one we are happy with but we had to change the way we clean glassware because popcorn leaves so much more oil on people’s hands—an unintended consequence of a simple change.
Back in 1927 Werner Heisenberg stated that uncertainty is, by definition, inherent in that branch of science we call quantum physics. One can know the exact speed of some moving object (say a photon of light) or one can know its exact position—but not both. Heisenberg explained that in order to know the object’s exact position you must catch it and its speed becomes 0. Contrariwise, to know its exact speed the object must remain in motion and so the exact position at a given time cannot be determined.

Thu
02
May
admin's picture

Todd: More ways to define Coloradoan

Before I get to reader submissions regarding our request to participate in last week’s “Foxworthy-isms,” let’s talk about submissions for letters to the editor.
Didn't see your letter to the editor today? It could be because you submitted it well over our 500 word limit. Or, it could be because you didn't provide your first and last names. And, it's very possible you are reading this now and thinking "why didn't they just call me?" It could be, too, that you didn't provide your phone number when you submitted your letter, so we have to get our message to you this way.
You can call me at 325-2838 if you believe your letter should have been here. (Hint: there are two of you out there!)
We publish these rules of engagement fairly often. Here they are again:

Thu
02
May
admin's picture

Billings: ROSIE’S RUN FOR THE ROSES and other comments on life…..

Women bring something different to their connection with horses. In most cases, obviously, the ones I have observed, men just don’t have that connection….that special connection…. Now I know I probably will make some men mad….but so be it…..go lick your wounds elsewhere….For me, it is about woman and horses.
Although I am not a fan of horse racing, the top jockey at this moment is 25 year old Rosie Napravnik, and she is competing in this week’s Kentucky Derby. Rosie will make a “run for the roses.” Go Rosie. As Rosie’s sister Janice put it on "60 Minutes" on Sunday, "Men may have an advantage with their physical strength, but women have finesse." Ah, so true. Rosie is 5’2” and weighs in at 113 pounds, exactly.

Sun
21
Apr
admin's picture

Todd: Interpreting the meaning of a bill

A loyal Log Hill reader pointed out that I added extra digits to my unemployment numbers last week for Colorado. Instead of stating the total unemployed in Colorado is slightly over two million, I should have said slightly over 200,000. Likewise, the 2007 figure was slightly under 100,000, not one million.
My late-night blurry eyed error doesn’t change the fact that this is, quite possibly, the slowest recovery in U.S. history. As John Taylor, Professor of Economics at Stanford University points out, the growth rate headed out of the recession in the 1980s was six percent, compared to our current two percent rate.

Sun
21
Apr
admin's picture

Johnson: Utah on my mind

Utah on my mind…car, windows and other places the sun doesn’t shine; confessions of a Spoiled Snowbird

Sun
07
Apr
admin's picture

Todd: A higher level of devotion

According to the American Kennel Club 2012 dog registration statistics, Labrador retrievers are the most popular dogs in the U.S. Second on the list are German shepherds and third are golden retrievers.
Newspaper people must be a trendy bunch. The Plaindealer staff has one of each of the above.
This week, however, we lose our chief mascot, Bogey, to cancer. Eleven years ago, Beecher and I weren't looking to get another dog, just months after losing our longtime pet. We thought it would be nice to take a few years off. We had two young boys who left plenty around the house to clean up after without adding a new source of stink.

Thu
28
Mar
admin's picture

Todd: Meandering through our ancestral pages

Meandering through the ancestral pages of our great-grandparents, the Ouray Times and Ouray Herald, can be a fun way to connect to the past. It takes only one search to get me going and then I’m off to another and another. Here are a few items I ran across in pages prior to the turn of the century—the other century:
“Fred H. Andrus, wife, child and maid, of Chicago, spent several days at the Beaumont the first of the week, and enjoyed the beautiful mountain scenery of Ouray. Mr. Andrus is a member of the firm of A.G. Spalding & Co., Chicago, and in 1876 belonged to the Chicago baseball club, which won the National League pennant for the first time.”
Ouray Herald, Oct. 12, 1899, page 3

Thu
28
Mar
admin's picture

Alaimo: Opening our hearts and tables

I remember growing up in Brooklyn. Every summer they would cordon off our four-square block neighborhood and throw a block party. There were fireworks, sausage and pepper hoagies, homemade Sangria and catching lightning bugs in jelly jars. It seems like every house had tables set up with food on the sidewalk and we would walk around visiting and enjoying them. Surprisingly, very few houses did not offer something and yet, as far as I could tell, everyone (regardless of whether they set up a table or not) was welcome at every other house. I also remember that next door to us there was a tiny house that looked like a beach house. The people who lived there seemed incredibly old to my pre-teen self but I loved to visit them because of their amazing library. In that little den I discovered the complete Tarzan and the Pellucidar series, plus rows of Fleming, London, Asimov, Poe, Doyle and more—all in hardback and covering the wall like thick wallpaper.

Pages

Subscribe to Columns