Columns

Wed
12
Jun
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Zanett: Night Songs

Thu
06
Jun
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Todd: It's all about the open process

Last week we offered our view on the group of business people in Ridgway who met, representing a minority of Ridgway businesses, to coalesce a presentation of their views on Ridgway’s Streetscape project.  At this late stage of the process, as the committee formed by the Town is on the verge of presenting a recommendation to the town council, we felt an exclusive meeting, not open to all, was unproductive.
At the Streetscape committee meeting on May 24, one member, as reported, characterized their meeting as done “in a divisive way.”
But this business group wasn’t the only group making a presentation of a select group's thoughts. The Streetscape committee’s own recent informal survey was presented at the same meeting. It, like the business group, sampled only a portion of the businesses. Two Streetscape committee members spoke one on one with some Ridgway business owners—not all—and presented some of their responses to the committee.

Thu
06
Jun
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Billings: What’s in a name?

I remember that my mother told me that she and my dad thought long and hard about what to name us kids. As you know, my name is Alice. My brother’s name is Peter. They thought that they had chosen the best names. I think all kids go through a phase of not liking their names and somewhere along the line—probably in high school as I did—when we are really defining who we are, we take on nicknames and choose to be called something else. When you look up the meaning of Peter, it tells you that it means solid as a rock, a stone……that’s pretty good….and Alice…..means truthful, a morally strong person. So that’s pretty good. I think my parents had it right. Do we take on the personality of the name?? Do we grow into our names at some point? Not to offend anyone, I always thought, how can parents name a baby Harry or Morris or Sigmund.  Every culture has their top names I suppose. So I have done some thinking about all of this.

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Thu
30
May
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Magstadt: When A Bear Bugs You …Keep the “Bug” Spray Handy

Rocky and I had a close encounter with a black bear at the cabin this morning. An hour or so before sunrise, Rocky growled in that low rumble the way he does when something is wrong but he's not sure what. Call it his pre-bark mode.

I thought it was just the humidifier gurgling, but a little voice in my foggy head told me to get up and investigate. I opened the blinds and saw the furred arch of a large back.

Cinnamon fur!  Wrapped around a bear.  It was probably the same bear that visited the premises a week ago, wasn’t afraid of gun shots or banging pots, and was only persuaded to leave when some big rocks hurled in earnest nearly bounced off his fat head.

So it's 6:00 AM on Sunday, Memorial Day weekend, there's not a soul within miles of here, and there’s a bear under my bedroom window. Interesting.

Thu
30
May
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Todd: On cops and committees

When Ouray police officers voiced their concerns to the Ouray City Council at a work session after implementation of the four days on, three days off scheduling, the recommendation to the officers from city administrator Patrick Rondinelli was give it some time.
Prior to presenting its report at a council meeting, a KRW Associates representative and Rondinelli met with segments of the city council, in pairs and with the mayor separately. Consensus of the council was never reached nor asked for in switching to the new schedule. But, then again, consensus was never needed.

Thu
23
May
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Todd: "Oink" if you love Ridgway

Ouray County surely had a different look about it six or seven decades ago. The 40s and 50s were not that long ago, though I do get to say they preceded me.
Patricia (Strickland) Betters, however, grew up on her family’s ranch just outside of Ridgway during those years.
Situated under Court House Rock some five miles east of town, the 365 acre ranch serves as the backdrop to “Oink, a love story,” a children’s book written by Betters for her grandchildren, to illustrate to them how she grew up in this beautiful part of Colorado.
And, fortunately for the rest of us—even us older children—we get a glimpse into a day in the life of a young girl in Ouray County many decades ago.

Thu
23
May
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Magstadt: Natural Gas, Prairie Dog Towns, And Magical Thinking

On April 25, faculty experts from Colorado State University were in Washington, D.C., to give    Congressional staffers a briefing on natural gas extraction and hydraulic fracturing. Former Governor Bill Ritter, Jr., who is currently the director of the Center for the New Energy Economy at CSU led the panel. The briefing, called "Getting Natural Gas Right" focused on finding technologies and policies aimed at the best – most environmentally sound – ways to extract the stuff.
When it comes to fossil fuel and carbon emissions, there's simply no way to avoid controversy, but CSU as an institution is understandably at pains not to offend any- body's sensibilities: “As an academic and scientific enterprise, Colorado State does not take any side in the debate over gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing, instead preferring the role of the neutral broker," said CSU's VP for Research.

Thu
23
May
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Johnson: Feral nose and ear hair: Up to my neck in “Golden Pond”

It’s right there in the Bible. Proverbs 16:18: “Pride goeth before the fall.” And “The Fall” sneaks up with the stealth of a practiced assassin. Next thing you know you can’t get up, and your bathtub has a chair and a door in it. Lord, I never thought I’d live long enough to get old.
It starts subtly, with receding hairlines, crow’s feet wrinkles and, most hurtful, going unnoticed (as in, invisible!) by the fairer gender. You start skipping showers, wearing the same shirt four days in a row…the one with egg yolk dribbled down the front…and wondering how the Fountain of Youth suddenly turned into a “Golden Pond.” One day you’re a tall, tanned and ruggedly handsome outdoor gent, the next, you’re standing in front of a truthful mirror, aghast at the exacting toll sun, time and gravity has taken on your body. A thousand pushups and the best haircut in the world can’t arrest “The Fall” from pride and pulchritude (sniff).

Thu
23
May
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Alaimo: Measuring the speed of progress when sitting still

Earlier this year we switched from pretzels to popcorn at the Still. A simple switch and one we are happy with but we had to change the way we clean glassware because popcorn leaves so much more oil on people’s hands—an unintended consequence of a simple change.
Back in 1927 Werner Heisenberg stated that uncertainty is, by definition, inherent in that branch of science we call quantum physics. One can know the exact speed of some moving object (say a photon of light) or one can know its exact position—but not both. Heisenberg explained that in order to know the object’s exact position you must catch it and its speed becomes 0. Contrariwise, to know its exact speed the object must remain in motion and so the exact position at a given time cannot be determined.

Thu
02
May
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Todd: More ways to define Coloradoan

Before I get to reader submissions regarding our request to participate in last week’s “Foxworthy-isms,” let’s talk about submissions for letters to the editor.
Didn't see your letter to the editor today? It could be because you submitted it well over our 500 word limit. Or, it could be because you didn't provide your first and last names. And, it's very possible you are reading this now and thinking "why didn't they just call me?" It could be, too, that you didn't provide your phone number when you submitted your letter, so we have to get our message to you this way.
You can call me at 325-2838 if you believe your letter should have been here. (Hint: there are two of you out there!)
We publish these rules of engagement fairly often. Here they are again:

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