Columns

Thu
03
Apr
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Blending of medicines can be the best cure

One of the television shows that I have loved has been “Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman.” True, it’s just a show; however, a conventional lady doctor in the late 1800s learning medicinal uses for herbs from a Native American is totally fascinating. Traditional or conventional medicine working hand in hand with alternative or complementary therapies….and that’s how it should be. Guess you could say that I lived vicariously through Dr. Quinn, since as a young person I thought seriously about becoming a doctor. Loving medicine, loving the west, loving being a fish out of water….the show really hit home for me. How unconventional being a lady doctor in those days! Or maybe it was her love interest, the handsome mountain man, Sully. Hmm.
 
Wed
29
Jan
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Magstadt: Hey, Snowbirds, Don'chya Know? Ice Is Nice And So Is Snow

"Oh the weather outside is frightful. But the fire is so delightful. And since we've no place to go. Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!"

Nice lyrics, but let's face it, not everybody loves snow.

Snowbirds, for example. You know, the migratory folks who flock to Florida, Texas, Arizona and California every winter. Such salubrious destinations are bound to suffer a drastic reversal of fortunes, however, if dire predictions of global warming come to pass and winter becomes a thing of the past.

Global warming? The only climate change apparent in Colorado at this time of year is the kind that rewards the wisdom of wearing woolens.

Living in the snow-capped mountains of Colorado in winter it's hard to imagine that there isn't enough snow in the world. And easy to see why so many people don't like the stuff.  For starters, cars and snow are enemies. Ditto for car batteries and cold weather.

Wed
29
Jan
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Todd: Birds of a feather hide together

When Interior Secretary Sally Jewell visited Moffat County Tuesday to discuss the future of the greater sage grouse and the possibility of designating it as an endangered species, she held a gathering at a ranch, out in the open with press and all.
Later that day, when joined in Craig at the Legion hall with Gov. Hickenlooper, the Moffat County commissioners, elected officials from neighboring counties and community members, Jewell banned the press. No member of the community was excluded that wanted in, yet Jewell twice barred a Craig Daily Press reporter access to the meeting.
According to a story in the Grand Junction Daily Sentinel, Interior spokesman Blake Androff said the press was turned away in order to "allow for an open and frank discussion."

Tue
07
Jan
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Todd: Say what you want...really!

Say what you want about Ouray City Administrator Patrick Rondinelli…really, say what you want.
You always could. At every City Council meeting there is a public comment period. If you ever have any comment as to how Patrick is running the city, you can stand up and say so.
Of course, when and if you do, Patrick will be sitting there and will be able to respond. And council may ask him questions about your constructive comments. They may also ask you questions. Patrick would be able to respond to council's questions. You might even stumble into an actual conversation with council about your concerns and/or commendations regarding Patrick.
That's the way it should be.
Yet, a few weeks ago the majority of council decided to allow unsigned, confidential comments to be submitted to the city by Ouray citizens with the express purpose of allowing council to use what it deems true and relevant from those comments in evaluating Patrick's job performance.

Mon
30
Dec
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Todd: Save the cook

At a school board meeting Monday night, Ridgway School Board member Roger Sagal reassured a crowd of nearly 100 of the board's electorate that Principal Jim Bob Hobbs' dismissal was not a foregone conclusion. In a letter to the editor today from another board member, we find out that just was not true.
Today's letter to the editor states that if a vocal crowd had not barred the board from entering into executive session, Hobbs’ dismissal was a foregone conclusion. Had Hobbs not gone public, then the board would have fired him, as “he would have found himself unemployed at the end of the school year, if not sooner,” the board member wrote. Presto! Just like that, as a matter of course. Fait accompli.

Tue
24
Dec
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Alaimo: Invisible gremlins filling volleyballs

Why is there air? This was the title of a 1965 Bill Cosby album and part of a very funny bit that Bill did. As Bill tells it, he had a girlfriend in college who, being very smart and a philosophy major, would go around the house asking questions like “Why is there air?” Bill laughs and says that any phys-ed major knows why there is air. It’s to fill up volleyballs and basketballs.

Tue
24
Dec
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Todd: Inspections not what they seem

When the Mine Safety and Health Administration presented nearly 100 citations and orders to Revenue-Virginius mine operator Star Mine Operations, none of these citations related to the tragic incident in November that left two employees dead and sent nearly two dozen to area hospitals. News reports pounced on the recent citations made during investigation of the incident.
One news report suggested a link to one citation for poor ventilation in the mine as being the cause of the deaths. The citation, however, didn't specify where within the mine the poor ventilation was cited, nor when it occurred or the degree to which it occurred.
Making that leap, or suggesting it, was extraordinary, to say the least.
I asked a local restaurant owner recently, one who always achieves high marks during inspections, if his restaurant ever passes an inspection without being cited for an infraction. "Never," was the answer.

Wed
11
Dec
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Johnson: All I want for Christmas is Thanksgiving

I’m attempting to pen this column on a Thanksgiving holiday return flight from Philadelphia, Pee A, to Lost Wages, Nevada (alas, “cheap fares”). We had a wonderful three-generation convergence with family back east. Not having flown recently, I must say that Hell’s fury is a cakewalk compared to the ordeal of security lines, being patted down, felt up and having my private parts X rayed. Now I get to spend six hours wedged in a child sized seat—a full waist size larger and 10 pounds heavier than on the pre- Thanksgiving flight—inhaling atomized coughs, sneezes and spittle of three hundred strangers from God knows where. This is not a metaphor: we ARE sardines...fin to fin, shoulder to shoulder; backs to laps. Not if, but when, the coming plague purges our planetary Petri dish of humankind's greed, overconsumption and overpopulation, to something more realistic and sustainable, its mechanism will most assuredly be airplanes (cough).

Wed
11
Dec
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Todd: Being left out in the cold

• The experts were saying that pigskin carpetbagger Payton Manning, who used to toss in the warm confines of Indianapolis' dome in December, wouldn't fare well in the Denver chill. All he did Sunday, when the temperature was nearing single digits, was set a Denver Broncos franchise record with 39 completions, toss four touchdowns and lead his team to 51 points. Evidently, Payton can play well in any type of dome, including snow domes.
• My brother in Gunnison called the other day. He was excited that he had just bought an artificial tree. He and his wife, for years, had purchased a forest service permit to cut their own Christmas tree. But with the biting cold this year, he couldn't have been happier that he wasn't somewhere near Kebler Pass or Taylor Park in sub-zero weather sawing on a tree trunk.

Mon
02
Dec
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Todd: Reflection and remembrance

One hundred years ago this week, in Ouray County, life was not so different than today. On Nov. 21, 1913, mining dominated the headlines in the Ouray Herald. The Camp Bird Mine released its annual report, which disclosed net earnings of $270,042 on a gross of $679,693 revenues.
The Revenue mine, it was announced, was under new lease by J. E. Lyon of Denver. He hoped to have up to 15 men working the mine within weeks, provided his power supply was reliable.
David Foerster, of the zinc mill, announced he was closing his mill for a few weeks to make needed improvements. Manual labor reductions would increase productivity with the upgrades to be made.
And, the first meeting of the San Juan Mining Bureau was held that week in Silverton. B. H. Du Prau of Ouray was elected president and began the process of adopting by-laws and a constitution.

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